Day 11 – Eureka to Weott, CA

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Just off the 101, tons and tons of lumber stretch for a while to the right and tons of logs to the left

Getting started this morning was a struggle.  Dallas and I didn’t roll out until almost 11am, then stopped less than a mile down the road at the grocery store for another 20-30 minutes before we really hit the road.  I think the long days and miles without much rest in between has been wearing on us, and it has been tough to motivate ourselves out and onto our bikes for another long ride.  Personally, I have been dealing with some knee pain and saddle sores, while Dallas has struggled with an ingrown toenail and mental challenges.  Miles have been going by painstakingly slowly lately.

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This place is wonderful

Fortunately, it was another beautiful day, and it’s hard not to be happy out in the sunshine.  The traffic and hills were not too bad today, and after lunch we got to experience riding down the Avenue of Giants, through the Humboldt Redwoods State Park.  We stopped about halfway through our ride in the quaint town of Rio Dell, where we had amazing Mexican food at Tonetta’s.  The Avenue of the Giants took us off the highway and into the forest, where it grew darker and cooler under the super tall redwood trees. 

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Riding down the Avenue of the Giants

The Avenue also took us through a small town called Redcrest, where we made one last stop for hydration and a bathroom break.  The lady working at the shop where I bought some lemonade asked in a hoarse voice if I thought it would be a good idea for people who use bicycles for transportation to be required to have registration and insurance.  I’m curious to know what other people think of this, but I like that bicycling is accessible to people of all ages and income levels, and I’m afraid requiring registration and insurance would only be an obstacle to discourage cycling.  I do think that it’s a good idea to teach cycling to kids in schools like they do in other countries, such as the Netherlands and Denmark.  Maybe having them pass a course in school so they can earn a license to ride will make cycling more popular as a transportation method.  As for insurance, I all insurance is generally a rip-off.

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In the forest it's dark in the daytime

We continued through the forest until Burlington Campground, after having gone just about 50 miles.  Dallas and I had just enough time to pitch our tent before needing our headlamps to see.  Now, under these giant trees, it is really quite dark.  Our campsite is pretty close to the road, but hopefully traffic will be light enough for us to get a good sleep.  I think we’re both so tired that it probably wouldn’t matter anyway.

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About Sarah

Sarah grew up in Cranston - just south of Providence, Rhode Island - and developed a love for travel, music, and outdoor sports at an early age. She had started bicycling long distances at age 12, as a participant of the MS150 bike tours to raise money for the MS Society. She didn't use her bike regularly until she built her own while studying in Montreal and found it an excellent way to get around the city. After graduating from McGill and moving back to Providence, Sarah started working at Brown University's office of Environmental Health & Safety as the Biological Safety Specialist. She was living 4 miles away at the time, and for the first few weeks was driving to work. She made the switch from driving to bicycling when she realized that she could get to work faster, avoid parking tickets, and integrate a few miles of training into her day. Bicycling was better for the environment and better for her own health and mood. She found that she had more energy and felt much happier once she started biking to work. When her car broke down several months later, she never bothered replacing it. After 4 years of working in Biosafety (and on her master's in Environmental Studies), Sarah left her job to pursue her passion. She has been working various jobs in the bicycle industry since June of 2011, including pedicab driver, bicycle tour guide, bike mechanic and traveling bicycle advocate. In between seasonal jobs, she has done a few long-distance bike tours, which is the main reason for this blog. Her dream is to eventually ride around the world and sail across the oceans.

Posted on 17 October 2013, in Bicycle Touring, Portland to San Francisco and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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